The History of make-up

The History of make-up
Views: 2446
0 0
Read Time:3 Minute, 48 Second

The history of makeup is a long and fascinating one. From ancient Egyptians applying henna to their eyelids to American Indians using ground minerals such as red ocher (a clay colored by iron oxides) and charcoal to decorate their faces and bodies before weddings and war parties, cosmetics have been used as a form of self-expression since earliest civilizations.

Makeup has been used as a form of self-expression since the earliest civilizations.

In ancient Egypt, makeup was used to show status and wealth. It was also used to show religious beliefs about death, as well as social status and political beliefs.

Makeup has been around for thousands of years, but it wasn’t until the 20th century that commercial brands began producing cosmetics for mass consumption. The history of make-up is long and varied: here are some key moments in its development over time!

Ancient Egyptian women used malachite, a green copper ore, as eye shadow.

Malachite is a copper carbonate hydroxide mineral. It is the most common ore of copper and has been used since ancient times as a gemstone, as well as for ornaments and jewelry. Malachite can be found in Russia, the United States, Canada, Mexico, Chile and Australia (where it’s known as “blue stone”).

In ancient Egypt women used malachite as eye shadow; they mixed it with water to create an ink that was used on papyrus scrolls to write down important information such as legal contracts or religious texts.

Ancient Egyptian women also applied henna, a dye made from the root extract of a tropical plant called Lawsonia inermis, to their eyelids, cheeks and lips.

Henna is a plant that grows in Africa and the Middle East. The leaves of henna produce a red dye when they’re crushed, making it popular for use in body art such as tattoos or temporary henna tattoos.

Henna has been used for thousands of years for cosmetic purposes, including coloring skin and hair. In ancient Egypt women would apply henna to their eyelids, cheeks and lips for an added pop of color during celebrations like weddings or parties held at temples.[1]

The Greeks and Romans used crushed beetles, mixed with olive oil and vinegar to make rouge.

The Greeks and Romans used crushed beetles, mixed with olive oil and vinegar to make rouge. Red ocher (a clay colored by iron oxides) and charcoal were also used as pigments in make-up at this time.

Chinese courtesans wore elaborate face powders made from rice powder mixed with borax and egg white.

Rice powder was a common ingredient in ancient Japan and China. Rice powder was used to make face powders that were applied with a fan brush and then blended with water. Egg white was added to rice powder to help it adhere better to the skin, while borax was added as an emollient and preservative.

American Indians used ground minerals such as red ocher (a clay colored by iron oxides) and charcoal to decorate their faces and bodies before weddings and war parties.

Native Americans used ground minerals such as red ocher (a clay colored by iron oxides) and charcoal to decorate their faces and bodies before weddings and war parties. Red ocher was made from iron oxides, which are naturally occurring in rocks. Charcoal was made from burned wood, which can also be found in nature. Both of these substances were used for ceremonial purposes by American Indians.

In 1584 an Italian woman named Trota di Cione wrote a book called Secreti della Signora Trota on beauty treatments for the skin using creams, lotions and herbal remedies.

In 1584 an Italian woman named Trota di Cione wrote a book called Secreti della Signora Trota on beauty treatments for the skin using creams, lotions and herbal remedies. She was a courtesan and her work became very popular with other women of her time.

In 1770 Massachusetts banned the use of all cosmetics except for “blacks” i.e., kohl eye pencils or coal dust for lips!

Makeup is a form of self-expression, and has been used since the earliest civilizations. It’s a way to enhance beauty and create a new look. In 1770 Massachusetts banned the use of all cosmetics except for “blacks” i.e., kohl eye pencils or coal dust for lips!

Conclusion

Makeup has been used as a form of self-expression since ancient times. It’s interesting to see how different cultures have used makeup differently over time, but it all comes back down to one thing: women want to look good!

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *